Agronomics

Agronomics is the science used to keep your lawn lush and healthy

To keep your lawn green, growing and looking its best, a consistent program of fertilization is essential. Regular fertilization will lead to a thicker, healthier lawn that reduces erosion, filters pollutants, provides natural cooling and cleans the air. Plus, your lawn will be less likely to suffer from weed, insect and disease problems when it’s fertilized on a regular basis. And perhaps best of all, your lawn will need less water when it gets the nutrients it needs throughout the year.

WHAT’S IN A FERTILIZER, ANYWAY?

Fertilizer contains three primary (and many secondary) nutrients: nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Nitrogen promotes strong color and top growth, phosphorus stimulates root development, and potassium helps with disease resistance and water retention. For the best results, your lawn should be given these nutrients in evenly spaced treatments throughout the year.

HOW DO LAWNS USE FERTILIZER?

After fertilizer becomes mixed with the moisture in the soil, it’s absorbed by the plants through hair-like feeder roots. Once inside the plant, nutrients are distributed to the areas where they’re needed and can go to work building new roots, promoting fuller leaf growth, warding off diseases and helping the grass hold water throughout the seasons.
Based on our local history, we know the best fertilizer for your particular needs, and we can apply it in the right amounts at the right times of the year to ensure beautiful, healthy growth. Call us today for more information on our fertilization programs.

Crabgrass

To win the war against crabgrass, combine professional care with good follow-up practices. Thousands of seeds produced by last year’s crabgrass plants were blown and carried virtually everywhere. The trick is to keep the seeds from germinating. For that, action has to be taken early in the season, before weather gets too warm. Once seeds have germinated, aggressive crabgrass plants can take over. Professional treatment includes an application of a preemergence herbicide, watered in by rainfall or supplemental sprinkling, creating a barrier against sprouting crabgrass.
Keep this barrier intact by not raking and by watering to keep the soil from drying out and cracking.

You should also be sure not to cut your lawn too short. Such “scalping” leads to grass thinning, making it easier for crabgrass to flourish. For the same reason, don’t get too aggressive with your string trimmer or blade edger.

In some seasons and areas, a second application may be a good idea. If some crabgrass plants get growing even under your watchful eye, post emergence controls are available to take care of them.
Healthy, dense turf chokes out crabgrass, so the best defense against these unwanted plants is to combine our treatments with good mowing and watering practices to promote vigorous growth.

Weed Control

Even the most beautiful lawn is likely to have weeds appear at some point. Keeping a lawn “weed free” takes more than just having a couple of herbicide treatments each year. Nature finds ways to make sure something starts growing in any lawn that has become too thin. Bare patches of soil quickly fill up with broadleaf and grassy weeds of all sorts. That’s why a healthy, thick strand of grass is the very best weed prevention there is.

Below are a few facts you should know in winning your war with lawn weeds.

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